7.26.2010

Frayed Seams Quilt

Frayed Seams Quilt - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting in the RainThis is a fun and quick quilt that doesn’t involve binding. Since I didn’t use batting for this quilt I decided to use a semi-thick fleece for the backing fabric to keep a fluffy feel to it. I love how this quilt is basically an “inside-out” quilt, where the seams are all on the outside as opposed to hidden beneath the quilt top. After one wash, the frays on the quilt top will become super soft (skip down to the last picture to see), softer with each wash :)

Finished baby quilt measures 33”x38”.


Materials:
  • ¾ yards of 3 different fabric prints
  • 1 yard of semi-thick fleece
  • corresponding thread
Step 1 – From each of your 3 different fabric prints, cut 14 6.5” squares for a total of 42 squares. For quicker cutting, layer and fold your fabrics to cut multiple layers at once.
Frayed Seams Quilt - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting in the Rain

Step 2 –Arrange the squares in 6 rows of 7 squares each. In each row, sew the squares together: with wrong sides of fabric facing together, sew a ½” seam allowance. Start and end each stitch with a back-stitch.
Frayed Seams Quilt - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting in the Rain

Frayed Seams Quilt - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting in the Rain


Step 3 – After you’ve sewn the squares together in all 6 rows, sew the rows together: with wrong sides of fabric facing together, align the corners and pin to keep in place. Then sew a ½” seam allowance. Start and end each stitch with a back-stitch.
Frayed Seams Quilt - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting in the Rain

Frayed Seams Quilt - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting in the Rain


Step 4 – After all the rows have been sewn together, the quilt top should measure roughly 33”x38”. Lay the quilt top flat on top of the fleece. Baste to keep the quilt top and fleece in place: using jumbo size safety pins, pin where the seam intersections are (circled in red below). Start by pinning the center of the quilt and work your way out. Pin the sides and corners last.(Click pics to enlarge)
Frayed Seams Quilt - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting in the Rain

Frayed Seams Quilt - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting in the Rain


Step 5 – Now that your quilt top and fleece backing are basted together, you can start quilting! When quilting, always start from the middle of the quilt going outward. Start and end each stitch with a back-stitch.
Frayed Seams Quilt - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting in the Rain

I quilted straight lines going vertical and horizontal, forming squares. Below: Front and back of quilt (click pics to enlarge)
Frayed Seams Quilt - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting in the Rain

Frayed Seams Quilt - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting in the Rain



Step 6 – Trim the excess fleece backing around the perimeter of the quilt top. Then sew a ½” seam allowance around the perimeter of the quilt.
Frayed Seams Quilt - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting in the Rain

Frayed Seams Quilt - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting in the Rain



Step 7 – You’re just about finished! Lastly, using sharp fabric scissors (I used appliqué scissors), cut little frays (roughly ¼” apart) within all of the ½” seams. Do not cut outside of the seam.
Frayed Seams Quilt - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting in the Rain

That’s it! After a few washes, the frays will get softer and will look like this:
Frayed Seams Quilt - Quilting Tutorials and Fabric Creations - Quilting in the Rain

6 comments:

  1. I have been wanting to do one of these "raggety" type quilts and love the fleece backing on this one. Thank you for the tutorial!
    Okay...off to the store I go!!
    Patti

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  2. Hi Jera,

    I made one of these quilts after I saw your tutorial and I love how it turned out!

    I love the rag quilt look, but I don't care for how heavy rag quilts usually are -- all those layers make them so thick and stiff. This quilt is thinner (much more user friendly, especially for little ones), but with the fleece on the back it is still plenty warm and cozy! I enjoyed the process of making this quilt. Thank you so much for the idea!

    Regards,
    Heather B.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thank you! This is adorable. Will be a great donation quilt for our quilt guild support of Project Linus.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I love this quilt, you have the best tutorials!

    ReplyDelete
  5. This looks like the perfect kids quilt, as it will need to be washed often. I had a thought when you did the step where you trimmed the fleece edge...you could have folded it back over the edge & sewed flat as a binding. Just as an alternative edge. Thanks for the tut!

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  6. Thank you for the info. I have kept clothing from my Granddaughter. I am making a rag quilt out of her clothes with solid colors in between. I found a light weight backing for it. Since we live in south Florida not much need for a heavy qult. My Grandson got a quilt made from his and his Granddaddy's jeans. I used the back pockets from 4 of the jeans, now he has a place to hid his most important cars and trucks. I am a new quilter but the rag quilt will be my new gift for all new babies gifts.

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